They're Really Into The Face-Sitting, Kids Today

Lizzy. Actress. Sarcastic bitch. I like to reblog pictures of sad people touching each other.

crowcrow:

vmagazine:

'Speckled' - model: Alice Ma - photographer: Alex Evans - hair & make-up: Natalie Ventola - Chloe Magazine Spring14

  • M.A.C. Acrylic Paint in Black Black & Pure White
  • M.A.C. Clear Lipgloss (shine)
  • M.A.C. Chromaline in Landscape Green (eyes)
  • M.A.C. Satin Lipstick in Mocha (lips)
  • M.A.C. Chromacake in Rich Purple (eyes)
  • M.A.C. lip mix in Orange (lips)
  • M.A.C. Fluidline in Blacktrack (brows)

these looks are SO goooood

The fuck am I horny for. It’s not even 11am.

Become best friends with a spiritual brat and bingo bango you start seeing signs of fate everywhere and your love life has a path with just enough definition for you to keep waiting for things to line up. Because fate. Because why not?

“I’m afraid we’ll always be
a book with the end pages ripped out.”

– Madisen Kuhn, Does Time Truly Heal All Wounds? (via hellanne)

kendrajbean:


"It was the first night of ‘Antony and Cleopatra.’ The play was over, and out of the stunned silence which followed the climax of a great tragedy there arose a wave of clapping. A moment’s pause, and then the red and gold curtains of the St. James’s Theatre were held back."Hand in hand two people stepped forward to the footlights. They bowed and quite simply, and without any formality, Sir Laurence Olivier bent forward and kissed his wife’s hand. A second later the curtain went up on the full company, and then the Oliviers did something I cannot recall having seen on the stage before. They turned right around and now one with their audience, bowed in thanks to the rest of the cast.
"These two gestures—the kiss and the bow th the company—gave the audience a hint of something rare in the theatre—the combination of a husband and wife who are devoted to the theatre, to each other and to their fellow actors."
 —Felix Barker, The Lives of the Oliviers, 1951

kendrajbean:

"It was the first night of ‘Antony and Cleopatra.’ The play was over, and out of the stunned silence which followed the climax of a great tragedy there arose a wave of clapping. A moment’s pause, and then the red and gold curtains of the St. James’s Theatre were held back.

"Hand in hand two people stepped forward to the footlights. They bowed and quite simply, and without any formality, Sir Laurence Olivier bent forward and kissed his wife’s hand. A second later the curtain went up on the full company, and then the Oliviers did something I cannot recall having seen on the stage before. They turned right around and now one with their audience, bowed in thanks to the rest of the cast.

"These two gestures—the kiss and the bow th the company—gave the audience a hint of something rare in the theatre—the combination of a husband and wife who are devoted to the theatre, to each other and to their fellow actors."

—Felix Barker, The Lives of the Oliviers, 1951

I am a terrible writer and a bad actor.